Course Descriptions
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Courses G to J


[ A-B ] [ C-D ] [ E-F ] [ G-J ] [ K-L ] [ M-N ] [ O-P ] [ Q-S ] [ T-U ] [ V-Z ]


Course Credit Information
  • A - Usually offered alternate years
  • CR/NR - Credit if course is passed; no credit if not passed
  • N - Not regularly offered
  • S - May be offered as seminar
  • 2-3 - Credit may vary
  • SK - Skills course

206. GAMING LAW. 3
This course introduces students to the law of the rapidly growing area of gambling. Areas of study include determining whether an act constitutes gambling; the social harms of gambling; the licensing and regulatory processes of gaming; private law issues in gambling such as contracts and the enforcement of judgments, tribal gaming, pari-mutual gaming, state lotteries, sports betting, and poker. The class will also meet with state gaming regulatory officials. More information can be found here.

501. GENERAL CIVIL PRACTICE CLINIC. 4-6 CR/NC SK
In this clinical program, students represent clients who could not otherwise afford legal assistance. Clinic student attorneys take primary responsibility for their clients in cases involving civil matters. They conduct intakes, interviews and fact investigations; draft legal documents; handle negotiations; and represent clients in court hearings and trials, including jury trials. In addition, students participate in case selection and in weekly classes. Students also are required to attend a two-day, pre-semester orientation. Limited to students who have completed three semesters or more of law school and are eligible to receive a student practice license.

205. HEALTH LAW (INTRODUCTION TO). 3
This introductory course examines a variety of legal issues relating to health care quality, cost, access, reimbursement, organization, and finance. Special attention will be given to definitional approaches to sickness, health, and quality in health care; mechanisms for maintaining and improving the quality of health care, including provider self-regulation, professional licensure, credentialing, certification, accreditation, government regulation, and the tort system; access to health care, the physician-hospital relationship; physician peer review issues, private health insurance and public health care programs, health care organization issues, and health care antitrust issues. Students who take this course will be prepared to represent individual and institutional health care providers and commercial and public payors in civil, criminal, and administrative proceedings.

059. HEALTH LAW PRACTICUM. 2 SK
The Health Law Practicum is a two credit interprofessional simulation-based course designed to provide hands-on exposure to a complex and authentic healthcare legal situation. Law students will play the role of attorneys representing one of three healthcare clients. Master of Health Administration (MHA) students from Des Moines University (DMU) will play the role of the simulated healthcare clients. Student attorneys will review applicable documents, interview clients, and conduct discovery; culminating in a client memo that outlines legal options and makes final recommendations. The simulation experience will conclude with a joint debriefing where participants will receive critiques, discuss lessons learned, and exchange value-added peer review between the simulated attorneys and their clients. Prerequisite: Introduction to Health Law (Law 205)

399. HOLOCAUST AND THE LAW. 2
In this course students examine the legal and jurisprudential dimensions of the Nazi state and some of the post-war consequences of the Nazi era. Topics may include German history, the Nazi assumption and exercise of power through legislative and judicial means, the impact of international immigration restrictions on escape, the post-war trials of Nazi participants in the Holocaust, including deportation and denaturalization of American citizens, Holocaust denial, and some of the claims that have been the focus of post-war restitution litigation.

621. HONORS JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP. 6 CR/NC
Student interns learn about the state (appellate) and federal (trial and appellate) judicial decision-making process through work with a federal trial or appellate judge, with a justice of the Iowa Supreme Court, or with the highest state appellate court. Prerequisites - Completion of 45 credit hours, a minimum 2.7 GPA and a demonstrated commitment to scholarship (through participation in a law journal, significant research for faculty for publication, judicial internship, American Judicature Society internship, etc.), a strong academic record, and a faculty recommendation, and approval of the Judicial Internship Director and the Associate Dean.

263. IMMIGRATION LAW. 3A
Topics include regulation of family and employment-based immigration and deportation of criminal aliens.

516., 518. INCOME TAX CLINIC I & II . 2 CR/NC
Students will interview clients, analyze problems, work with the IRS and IA Department of Revenue and have the opportunity to appear before the tax court to litigate cases that are not settled.  Issues include innocent spouse, non-filers, appeals, collective alternatives, offers in compromise, etc.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax (LAW 208). Students must have completed Income Tax Clinic I before registering for Income Tax Clinic II.

600. INDEPENDENT INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/NC
Student arranges a one-time internship with a government institution or nonprofit organization that permits the student to perform lawyering skills under the direction and supervision of a faculty member and a supervising attorney. Approval of the associate dean is required.

615. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH. 1-3 CR/NC
An opportunity to engage in advanced research and writing. The subject of the research, the nature and quantity of the work required and the number of credits awarded are determined by the supervising professor. Not intended as a substitute for offered courses. Students may credit Law 615 only once toward the hours needed for graduation.

260. INSURANCE LAW. 3
Subjects include the insurance contract and its interpretation; life, casualty and liability insurance; selection and control of risks; claims adjustment; and regulation of the insurance industry.

607. INSURANCE LAW INTERNSHIP. 2 CR/NC
Students serve as interns with attorneys in the Legal Affairs Division of the Iowa Department of Insurance, participating in such varied activities as administrative decisions, enforcement actions and developing public policy under supervision of the commissioner.

282. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (INTRODUCTION TO). 3
This is a survey course covering the core areas of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret (and other state intellectual property-related areas) of law. It introduces each subject and explores commonalities and differences among different systems of intellectual property protection. The course can be taken by a nonspecialist interested in learning about the field, or as a segue to Drake University Law School's more detailed course offerings, including Copyright Law, Patent Law, Patent Office Practice, and Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law.

328. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE INTERNET AGE. 3
This seminar addresses selected areas of intellectual property law in which the Internet and new technologies have posed challenges to traditional legal doctrines and practices. It also explores the various legal, technological and business solutions that seek to accommodate the needs and interests of intellectual property rights holders, technology developers and internet users.  Each student is required to make a presentation to the seminar and write a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor. The paper may be used to satisfy the Advanced Writing Requirement. No prerequisites are required.

277. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING. 2
This course will focus on the licensing of intellectual property, primarily patents and tangible property, but also touch on trademarks and copyrights. The course will emphasize various terms which should be considered in license agreements and the negotiation perspectives of licensors and licensees. Students will also be exposed to the concepts of technology transfer and management of intellectual property. The course will utilize a textbook, handouts and representative license agreements. Students will be required to engage in the consideration and drafting of license terms. There will be no final exam. Grades will be based on assignments and a final project. Corequisites: Copyright (LAW 227), Patents (LAW 228), Trademarks (LAW 271) or Intro to Intellectual Property (LAW 282).

215. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION. 3A
Course examines litigation involving intellectual property assets. Material includes both skill development and theory. Students prepare complaints and pre-trial motions; examine the philosophy behind decisions to use certain types of motions; learn the pitfalls and proper methods of preparing witnesses for deposition and trial; and practice effective closing arguments. Prerequisites: Patent Law (LAW 228), Trademarks (LAW 271), Copyrights (LAW 227) or Intro to Intellectual Property (LAW 282). Recommended prerequisite: Federal Jurisdiction (LAW 235). 

293A/293B.  INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT & LAW: CUBA I & II
(Fall - 1 credit, Spring - 2 credits)
The course will involve weekly classes during the semester to discuss readings and lectures focused on the legal and agricultural situation in Cuba and relations with the United States.  The course will include an 8-day study tour to Cuba, during the winter break.  During the Fall semester students will begin a research paper on some aspect of Cuban agriculture and law and then in the Spring semester students will draft a final report and analysis based on observations from the trip.  The course will focus on a variety of topics including: History, status of trade embargo, role of U.S. agricultural trade with Cuba as force for liberalization, Cuba's legal system and agricultural development, impact of revolution on agricultural reform, land ownership and cooperatives, Cuba's legal education and judicial system, U.S. international agricultural development policy, etc.

399. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 2
This is an introductory course in international environmental law, designed primarily for those who have not previously studied the subject.  Although the United States and several other countries have made significant progress in addressing domestic and environmental problems, international environmental issues are becoming increasingly important.  As globalization of commerce grows and technology increasingly fosters connectedness, international environmental issues continue to increase in importance.  A tension inherent in many environmental issues is that they cannot be confined to a single country's borders.  Rather, environmental issues regularly cross international borders, holding little regard for state boundaries.  We will explore the legal mechanisms applied to try to resolve environmental issues when they originate, maintain, and/or conclude in many jurisdictions at different points in time.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

310. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. 3
Seminar examines international human rights law and the measures taken to effect human rights compliance. Topics include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; the International Bill of Rights; genocide; race and gender discrimination; and the relative importance of “second generation” economic, social, and cultural rights, in addition to the more traditional political rights. Case studies include the conflicts in the Middle East; human rights in China and the Islamic world; and the debate over “third generation” human rights, like the rights to sustainable development and a healthy environment.

317. INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW. 3
Through a review of the relevant provisions of U.S. law and multilateral treaties, this seminar covers the international components of copyrights, patents, trademarks, and other forms of intellectual property rights. The course also examines recent developments in the European Union and problems of enforcing intellectual property rights in less developed countries. Conducted in a seminar format, the course is limited to 20 students. Each student is required to make a presentation to the seminar and write a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor. The paper may be used to satisfy the Advanced Writing Requirement. No prerequisites are required.

262. INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 3
An overview of the global trading system governed and administered under the World Trade Organization (WTO) charter. Topics include globalization and its impact; the classification and regulation of imports and exports; how the WTO dispute settlement system works; and the roles played by international organizations like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in promoting worldwide economic development.

221. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE LAW. 3
A general survey of the legal problems of agriculture that serves as a thorough introduction to the study of agricultural law. Course focuses on various areas of law that directly affect the operation of the farm business and includes a review of selected regulatory programs. Discussion includes an analysis of the impact that law and government regulation have on agricultural production, distribution and marketing.

205. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH LAW. 3
This introductory course examines a variety of legal issues relating to health care quality, cost, access, reimbursement, organization, and finance. Special attention will be given to definitional approaches to sickness, health, and quality in health care; mechanisms for maintaining and improving the quality of health care, including provider self-regulation, professional licensure, credentialing, certification, accreditation, government regulation, and the tort system; access to health care, the physician-hospital relationship; physician peer review issues, private health insurance and public health care programs, health care organization issues, and health care antitrust issues. Students who take this course will be prepared to represent individual and institutional health care providers and commercial and public payors in civil, criminal, and administrative proceedings.

282. INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. 3
This is a survey course covering the core areas of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret (and other state intellectual property-related areas) of law. It introduces each subject and explores commonalities and differences among different systems of intellectual property protection. The course can be taken by a nonspecialist interested in learning about the field, or as a segue to Drake University Law School's more detailed course offerings, including Copyright Law, Patent Law, Patent Office Practice, and Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law.

100. INTRODUCTION TO LAW. 0
A brief introduction to legal studies as a part of the Law School's orientation for new students. Material covered includes significance of precedent, the judicial function and jurisprudential concepts as applied to the problems of rights in conflict.

001. INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES LAW. 3  (for 3+3 students only)
This course has three principal objectives. The first is to provide an overview of the American legal system. Students will be introduced to the basic institutions of American law. The second objective is to provide students with the tools they need to succeed in law school. Students will learn how to brief and read appellate cases and how to write legal memoranda. The third objective is to introduce students to the practice of law. This portion of the course is experiential. Students will observe lawyers as they argue motions in court and will have the opportunity to discuss what they observe with law students, judges, and professors.

The structure of each class will be as follows. The firs thalf of the class will provide a concise introduction to a major topic of American law. The second half will involve a class discussion of jurisprudentially important cases and articles that more fully develop the topic discussed in the first half of the class.

630. IOWA ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE INTERNSHIP 3 CR/NC
Students are placed in the Division of Criminal Appeals in the Iowa Attorney General’s Office, to develop skills in the area of criminal appellate practice. The internship allows students the opportunity to participate in all stages of appellate practice, from briefing on motions for interlocutory appeals to the potential for arguing appellate cases at the Iowa Court of Appeals or Iowa Supreme Court. Students may not work in the Criminal Defense Clinic or Appellate Clinic at the same time as this internship. Students who have performed any criminal defense work in a private firm must perform a conflicts check and make appropriate arrangements to avoid ethical conflicts. Students must have completed Evidence (LAW 113) and Criminal Procedure I (LAW 236) prior to enrollment.

605. IOWA CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/NC
Students work on a variety of projects as an intern for the Iowa Civil Rights Commission for at least 45 hours for each hour of credit. Prerequsite or co-requisite:Employment Discrimination (LAW 302), Civil Rights (LAW 240) and permission of the instructor.

618. IOWA SUPREME CT SCHOLAR INTRNSHP. 3 CR/NC
One third-year student will be selected for academic year residence at the Iowa Judicial Branch Building, co-authoring a law review article with an Iowa Supreme Court Justice. Student(s) are selected in August. The research commitment extends over the entire academic year (fall/spring); however, credit will be given in the spring semester. Criteria for selection is as follows: A demonstrated commitment to scholarship (through participation in a law journal, significant research for faculty for publication, judicial internship, American Judicature Society internship, etc.), strong academic record, and faculty recommendations. Students should apply through the Associate Dean’s office.
 
624. IOWA WORKERS COMPENSATION COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/NC
The Industrial Commissioner is the top official for the administration of Iowa Workers' Compensation law. Students in this internship would work on a variety of projects for the Iowa Industrial Commissioner's Office located in Des Moines. The student would participate in the drafting of opinions in contested workers' compensation cases. This would entail working closely with the Iowa Industrial Commissioner and the Deputy Industrial Commissioners. Students would have a unique opportunity to apply the rules of administrative law and the doctrine of worker's compensation in a hands-on-setting. A student would be required to put in 45 clock hours per academic credit hour and could take from three (3) to six (6) credits. Approval of the Curriculum Committee and the Associate Dean would be required for hours in excess of three (3). Workers' Compensation is not required though it is strongly encouraged and students who have taken or who are pre-registered for the course will be given preference in selection.

623. JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/NC
Students serve as judicial law clerks or as interns with public officials in a faculty-supervised program. Summer placement with federal and state judges, in other jurisdictions as well as in Iowa, is frequently arranged. Placement is at the discretion of the faculty supervisor after the student has completed not fewer than 30 hours of law school work with a minimum 2.3 cumulative grade point average.

631. JUVENILE COURT INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/NC
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement with a Polk county juvenile court judge doing research, observing hearings, drafting memos and sometimes decisions, and working on model court or court improvement projects when possible.

517 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY CLINIC. 4-6 CR/NC SK
Law students will represent youth charged in juvenile court with delinquent acts.  Students will represent youth in informal adjustments, detention hearings, adjudicatory hearings (trials) and dispositional hearings (sentencing).  The clinic includes a classroom component twice per week focusing on the procedural, constitutional, and statutory rules relating to youth charged as delinquents.

632. JUVENILE LAW APPELLATE INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/NC
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement in the Attorney General's office on appeals from placement on the Child Abuse Registry and Termination of Parental Rights. Students research and write briefs, and represent the state in prehearing conferences and administrative hearings.

620. JUVENILE LAW INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/NC
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement in the Polk county attorney's office prosecuting juvenile delinquency and child abuse and neglect cases.  Prerequisites Children and the Law and Trial Advocacy.


 
Last Modified: 3/20/2014 12:21:00 PM by Lori Richman