Course Descriptions
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Course Credit Information
  • A - Usually offered alternate years
  • CR/NC - Credit if course is passed; no credit if not passed
  • N - Not regularly offered
  • S - May be offered as seminar
  • 2-3 - Credit may vary
  • SK- Skills Course

228. PATENT LAW. 3A
Course includes an examination of trade secret law; the United States patent system; procedures for filing and obtaining U.S. patents; statutory requisites for patentability; infringement; fair use; and procedures for litigating infringement claims.

217. PATENT OFFICE PRACTICE. 3A
This course covers all aspects of proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office such as the formal requirements of a patent application and prosecution of patent applications before examiners. This includes drafting of claims, preparation of amendments, preparation of appeals, requirements for restriction, examiner interviews and the duty of candor before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Prerequisite: Patent Law (LAW 228).

255. PAYMENT SYSTEMS. 3A
This course examines payment systems in commercial transactions with primary emphasis on Article 3 (negotiable instruments) and Article 4 (bank deposits and collections) of the Uniform Commercial Code. The problem-solving technique is the predominant classroom experience.

614. POLK COUNTY PROSECUTOR INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/NC
Students are placed in the Polk County Attorney’s Office to develop skills necessary to practice as a trial attorney in prosecution. The internship allows students to participate in all aspects of criminal prosecution, including witness preparation, pretrial and post-trial hearings, misdemeanor jury and non-jury trials, and juvenile court proceedings. Students must have completed Evidence (LAW 113) prior to enrollment, and should either have taken or be simultaneously enrolled in Criminal Procedure I (LAW 236).

053. PRETRIAL ADVOCACY. 3 SK
Course examines the theory, practice and ethics of the four major elements of pretrial practice: pleading, including litigation planning, development of case theory, and drafting complaints and responsive pleadings; motion practice, including motions to dismiss, venue motions, motions for temporary and preliminary relief, and summary judgment motions; discovery, including interrogatories, depositions, requests for production, motions to compel and sanctions; and settlement strategy and mechanics.

010. PRINCIPLES OF LEGAL ANALYSIS. 0 Cr.
This course helps students develop core analytical skills.  Students will work on identifying rules from court decisions and other sources of law, applying rules to new fact situations, and communicating this application on law school exams.  The course begins with a diagnostic process  to assist students to identify specific areas in which they can improve their legal analysis skills. Students will complete exercises and receive individualized feedback designed to help them successfully write law school exams.

247. PRODUCTS LIABILITY. 3
Course examines the causes of action available for money damages in relation to defective products. The various actions include negligence; warranty; strict liability, including public misrepresentation; and specific remedies under the Uniform Commercial Code. The nature of the remedy, definitions of defectiveness and defenses available also are considered.

111. PROPERTY. 4
Course examines the nature and history of real and personal property concepts, including acquisition of property interests, concurrent estates, adverse possession, landlord and tenant rights and remedies; use of real property, including an examination of privately imposed controls such as easements and covenants; judicial introduction of public controls such as zoning and eminent domain.

150. PROSECUTION AND DEFENSE. 3
This course provides an intensive introduction to the real world of criminal law practice. A Drake Law professor will be the primary instructor, but prosecutors and criminal defense lawyers will also provide instruction and will be integral to the course. The course will focus on: the kinds of charges young lawyers most often prosecute or defend—assaults, driving while intoxicated, drug and weapons possession, criminal mischief, theft, etc.—as well as common defenses to those charges; sentencing, appeals, and post-conviction remedies; ethics issues particular to criminal cases; the nuts-and-bolts job duties and business practices of criminal law practitioners; step-by-step  analysis of the process of a case through the criminal justice system from both the prosecutorial and defense standpoints; systemic issues such as gang-related crime and white collar crime; and other practical matters as deemed appropriate by the instructors.

613. PROSECUTOR INTERNSHIP. 1 CR/NC
Students are placed in a County Attorney’s Office to develop skills necessary to practice as a trial attorney in prosecution. The internship allows students to participate in all aspects of criminal prosecution, including witness preparation, pretrial and post-trial hearings, misdemeanor jury and non-jury trials, and juvenile court proceedings. Students must have completed Evidence (LAW 113) prior to enrollment, and should either have taken or be simultaneously enrolled in Criminal Procedure I (LAW 236). Students may receive an hourly stipend.

305. PSYCHIATRY AND THE LAW. 2
A study of both civil and criminal aspects of law and the mental health system. Topics include constitutional issues relating to mental health, the commitment process, competency, and criminal mental defenses.

261. PUBLIC HEALTH LAW INTERNSHIP. 2 CR/NC
Students intern with an attorney in the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) for at least 100 hours and complete a paper analyzing the legal issue encountered in the internship. Prerequisites: Health Law (Law 205) and permission of the instructor. This course is graded CR/NC.

259. PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW. 3A
An analysis of basic concepts in public international law, including the nature of the international legal system and its institutions such as the United Nations and the World Court; the sources of international law; states and recognition; jurisdiction; nationality; human rights; the use of force and the laws of war; outer space; and jurisdictional immunities.

 
Last Modified: 6/20/2014 11:09:00 AM by Lori Richman