First Assignments
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Bar Examination Preparation - Rosenbloom

Below please find the assignment for the first day of class.
Required Texts: RIGOS BAR REVIEW SERIES: MBE VOLUMES 1 AND 2.
The assignment for the first day of class is:
• Prior to class complete the Intro Survey located under the “Assignment & Quiz Drop Box” tab on TWEN.
• Review the syllabus and bring any questions you have to the first day of class. If you have any questions before the first day, feel free to contact me.


Civil Procedure II - Doré

A. Required Texts: You should already have the Yeazell Casebook (8th ed.) and the 2014 Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The syllabus for the remainder of the semester will soon be posted on my TWEN page for this course. The SUPPLEMENT materials will also be posted on TWEN.

B. Reading Assignment for Tuesday, January 20, 2015:

CASEBOOK: Pages 17-20, 365-384;
FEDERAL RULES 8 and 12(b)(6);
TWEN SUPPLEMENT: Johnson v. City of Shelby, 135 S.Ct. 346 (Nov. 10, 2014).


Comparative Constitutional Law - Kende

Readings are from the Carolina Academic Press copyrighted draft of the casebook manuscript for Professor Kende's book, Comparative Constitutional Law: South African Cases and Materials in a Global Context.

Read the Preface, as well as pages 3-9 and 17-28 for the first class. It is optional to read pages 10-16. (Page numbers given are those that appear in the manuscript.)

 

Conflict of Laws - Doré

Required Text: The text for this course is Lea Brilmayer, Jack Goldsmith, & Erin O’Hara O’Connor, CONFLICT OF LAWS: CASES AND MATERIALS (6th ed. 2011).

Assignment for Tuesday, January 20, 2015:
     - Background and Introduction: Casebook pages xxv-14;
     - TWEN SUPPLEMENT (Methodological Chart).


Constitutional Law I - Kende

Assignment for the first class on January 20, 2015:
     - Read the U.S. Constitution (xli-lvi, Stone casebook)
     - Read pages 1-25 (Stone casebook)
 

Constitutional Law I - Schor

First Assignment:
Welcome back to law school and welcome to the first semester of Constitutional Law.
The first assignment has two parts:
(I) Please read the Constitution. It is a remarkably short document. In particular, pay close attention to the Preamble; Article I, sections 7-8; Article II; Article III; Article V; Article VI, section 2; and Article VII. You should also read the Bill of Rights which can be found in the first 10 amendments of the Constitution and section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment.
(a) Which part of the Constitution do you think is the most important? Why?
(b) What problems were the Framers trying to solve in writing the Constitution?

(II) In addition, please read Marbury v. Madison and the notes that follow the case, Chemerinsky pp. 1-11. When reading Marbury, please consider the following questions:
(a) What is the holding of the case? What is the rationale for the holding? In reading a constitutional case, you should seek to identify the governmental action that is being challenged and the constitutional provision that is being relied on by the litigants and the Court.
(b) Justice Marshall provides a number of examples of when courts should exercise the power of constitutional judicial review of legislation on pp. 7-8. Does he do a good job of telling courts when they should exercise judicial review?
(c) What does Justice Marshall tell us about the judicial review of executive action? When is it justified? (d) The case deals with three “questions” that are laid out on p. 2 of the opinion. Why did the Court discuss questions 1 and 2? Should the Court have discussed and resolved these questions?
(e) Could Justice Marshall have avoided deciding the constitutional issue? Should he have decided the case on narrower grounds?
 

Criminal Procedure I - Jurs

For the first class session on January 20, 2015, please read the following pages:

     The Traditional Role of Police; the Move to Community Policing; Police as Community Caretakers
     Miller & Wright text, pages 29-39, 1-10


Criminal Motions Practicum - McCord

Jan. 21: No assignment.


Criminal Procedure II - McCord

Jan. 21: No reading assignment, but bring to class a news article about the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, especially the grand jury proceeding that resulted in no indictment against the police officer.


Debtor/Creditor - Doré

The reading assignments appear in two books: Warren, Westbrook, Porter & Pottow, The Law of Debtors and Creditors (7th Ed. Wolters Kluwer 2014) (hereafter "Text") and Selected Commercial Statutes for Secured Transactions Courses (West 2014) (hereafter, "Statutory Supplement").

Note: While the listed Statutory Supplement will work best, earlier editions of the same statutory supplement (e.g., a 2013 or 2012 version) will also work fine. Similar commercial law statutory supplements from other publishers should also work, so long as they include the Bankruptcy Code. Please see me if you are not sure about the statutory supplement you plan to use.

I will be creating a Debtor Creditor course TWEN page in a few days. I am currently finalizing the Course Syllabus, which I will post under the “Syllabus” Forum of the TWEN page when it is ready.

The first few reading assignments are listed below:

For Tuesday, Jan. 20 please read the Text preface (pages xxvii – xxx) and pp. 1 – 21. Most of this material is a “big picture”overview of the debtor-creditor topic, and, more specifically, of bankruptcy. Don’t worry about the details. We will discuss Problems 1.1 – 1.3 in class, so please read them and give them some thought before coming to class.

For Wednesday, Jan. 21 please read pp. 23- 40 in the Text. We will discuss Problems 2.1, 2.2 and 2.5 in class.

For Monday, Jan. 26 please read p. 40 – 48 in the Text. We will discuss Problems 2.3, 2.4, 2.6 and 2.7 in class.


Entertainment Law - Johnson

Welcome to Entertainment Law! I’m looking forward to the semester.

For Wednesday, January 21, please read pages 1-31 in Weiler & Myers and Erik Nielson and Michael Render (aka Killer Mike), Rap's poetic (In)justice: Column, available at http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2014/11/28/poetic-injustice-rap-supreme-court-lyrics-violence-trial-column/19537391/.


Estate Planning - Begleiter

For Tuesday, January 20, please review the matters on the TWEN Page for the course.


Ethics - Yee

Books:
     Schwartz, et al., Problems in Legal Ethics (10th Edition);
     Lerman, Schrag and Gupta, Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law: Model Rules, State Variations, and Practice Questions 2015-2016

1st week (January 20): Please read Schwartz, Chapters 1 and 2 (pages 1-61) and the following sections of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct: Preamble, Scope and Terminology, §§ 1.0, 4.4(b), 5.5, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5

Please prepare the Discussion Problems for Chapter 1 only.
We will work through the Discussion Problems from Chapter 2 during the next week of class.


Evidence - Jurs

For the first class session on January 22, 2015, please read the following pages:
     Federal Rules of Evidence
     GF 1-19; GF FRE 606; Skim All Rules


First Amendment Seminar - Schor

Welcome to the First Amendment seminar.
For the first week, please read Chemerinsky, pp. 1197-1235.
I am looking forward to meeting you next Wednesday.


Food & The Law - Zwagerman


Week One
• Find an article that discusses a topic you believe falls into the definition of “Food Law” and bring a copy with you.
• Select your book for the in-class presentation that will be March 5 or 6
• Read pages 5-43 in “U.S. Food Law, Cases & Materials” by Lisa Heinzerling (available in library bookstore)
• Sign up for the TWEN site (may not be live until the weekend of January 17)


Gaming Law - Miller

For the first class on Tuesday, January 20, go to the TWEN page for the course: Miller, Gaming Law 2015.

Read the Administrative Details document for information about the course. We will talk more about all this in Tuesday’s class. In the text, read pages 1-20. In addition, consider the “What is Gambling” material on the TWEN link, Course Materials.


Intellectual Property Licensing - Yu

The first assignment and course information are available on the course web at http://www.peteryu.com/licensing/.
 

International Intellectual Property Law - Yu

The first assignment and course information are available on the course web at http://www.peteryu.com/intip/.

Legal Research II - Edwards

Week 1 Research Small Groups meet at special times on Tuesday, January 20 (and meet on Mondays thereafter):

Tuesday, January 20 §400
10:00 Research Group 1 Christopher Jessen Cartwright 202
10:00 Research Group 5 Kelly Nuckolls Cartwright 213
11:00 Research Group 2 Brianna Vaughn Cartwright 213

Tuesday, January 20 §401
10:00 Research Group 4 Levi Grove Cartwright 201
2:00 Research Group 3 Rob Evans Cartwright 201

   
Friday, Jan. 23 - Legal Research large sections meet
     Read Chapter 4 in Iowa Legal Research

Monday, Jan. 26  - Legal Research classes meet – large sections and small groups
     Read Chapter 7 in Iowa Legal Research
     CALIs on Statutes and Treaties due.

See Legal Research TWEN page for more details.


Legal Writing II - Pizzimenti

For the first day of class, read Slocum, Ch. 31, Ch. 34 (pp. 537-539 only), J. Giers, Basic Civil Process (Supp. at 2-7), C. Berry, Ethics and the Appellate Process (from Effective Appellate Advocacy: Brief Writing and Oral Argument (3d Ed.)) (Supp. 8 – 16), Standard of Review Guide and Sample (Supp. at 71-73), and M. Hermann, Standard of Review article (Supp. at 74-76).

The Supplemental Reading Packet is available on our TWEN page.

Legal Writing II - Shelton

For the first day of class, read Slocum, Ch. 31, Ch. 34 (pp. 537-539 only), J. Giers, Basic Civil Process (Supp. at 2-7), C. Berry, Ethics and the Appellate Process (from Effective Appellate Advocacy: Brief Writing and Oral Argument (3d Ed.)) (Supp. 8 – 16), Standard of Review Guide and Sample (Supp. at 71-73), and M. Hermann, Standard of Review article (Supp. at 74-76).

The Supplemental Reading Packet is available on our TWEN page.
 

Legal Writing II - Weresh

Week One Tues., 1/20
Appellate Briefs: Introduction to the Appellate Process and the Appellate Record; Rhetoric and Persuasion Reading due: Slocum, Ch. 31 Basic Civil Process (TWEN) Steven D. Stark, WRITING TO WIN, Ch. 4 (TWEN)


Products Liability - Miller

For the first class on Tuesday, January 20, read pages 1-24 in the casebook. Also, go to TWEN and review the Syllabus and Administrative Details. The course is listed as Products Liability 2015, Miller. We will discuss the material, the syllabus, and the administrative details on Tuesday.


Property - Anderson

Please consult syllabus posted on TWEN. Syllabus also contains information on Connected Casebook option for text.


Property - Johnson

Welcome to Property Law! I’m looking forward to the semester.

For Wednesday, January 21, please read pages 1-8 and 25-48 in Sprankling and Coletta.


Real Estate Transactions - Rosenbloom

Welcome to Real Estate Transactions!
The assignment for the first class is:
• From our Casebook, ROBIN MALLOY, JAMES SMITH, REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS: PROBLEMS, CASES, AND MATERIALS (4th ed. Aspen Pub. 2013) (NOTE: this is the 4th edition), read pages 1-6, 27-29, 56-59 (through Real Estate Transactions Timeline)
• Throughout the course we will rely on materials from the supplement on TWEN. Log on to our TWEN site and download and review the syllabus, which will be posted shortly
• Also from TWEN read: 
Seller Agency Agreement (Basic) 
Real Estate Brokerage Agreement to Represent Seller (Agreement) 
Samann v. Victory, 784 N.W.2d 201 (Iowa App. 2010) 
Not required reading , but with the increase of on-line property listings you may also be interested in viewing: Agreement to Share Commission With Un-Represented Buyer on TWEN
• We will review the following problem: Assume you represent Mark and Amy Seller (see broker agreements on TWEN), advise Mark and Amy on which of the two broker agreements in the supplement is more beneficial to them. Critical to this exercise, explain to the Sellers how the agreements are different.


Secured Transactions - Doré

The reading assignments appear in two books: Rusch & Sepinuck, Problems and Materials on Secured Transactions (3d ed. West 2014) (hereafter "Text") and Selected Commercial Statutes for Secured Transactions Courses (West 2014 ed.) (hereafter, "Statutory Supplement").

Note: If you took a class last year for which you purchased a recent commercial law supplement
(e.g., Sales, Negotiable Instruments, Debtor-Creditor), you should be able to use that supplement instead of the one listed above. See me with any questions. If any additional reading materials are required, I will provide them to you in class.

I am finalizing the Syllabus and will be posting it soon on a Course TWEN page.

The first reading assignments for the first week of class are listed below:

For Tuesday, Jan. 20 please read pp. 1 – 23 in the Casebook. This is the first of a two-part introduction to the general topic of “debt collection.” There is a lot of information in this introduction, but do not be alarmed. We are not reading this material with the goal of learning all of the details provided. Rather, the purpose of this material is to provide a general background about debt collection that will be helpful to understand the dynamics of a secured lending transaction.

The Illustration on p. 9 references the federal Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), which is included in the Statutory Supplement under the Consumer Credit Protection Act heading. You won’t be responsible for the details of the FDCPA on the exam, but you might want to look through it.

For Wednesday, January 21 please read pp. 23 - 43 in the Casebook. For Problem 1-1 (pp. 26-27 of Casebook) consider the Michigan statute only and omit Part C.


Securities Regulation - Leo

For the first class on Tuesday, January 20, please read pages 1-25 in the course book, Securities Regulation Cases and Materials by Cox, Hillman and LangeVoort.


Trial Advocacy - All Sections - Yee

First day assignment – Monday, January 26, 4:30 – 5:20

Book:
     Steven Lubet, Modern Trial Advocacy, Law School Third Edition

Please read pages 1-36 (Trial Basics & Case Analysis) and 349-402 (Closing Argument)

NOTE: All sections (Yee, Blane/Blink) will meet for this first class only (Jan. 26) at the Clinic Courtroom for required courtroom equipment training. All other Monday classes will be in Room 213.


Trial Advocacy - Yee

First day assignment – Wednesday, January 21

Book:
     Steven Lubet, Modern Trial Advocacy, Law School Third Edition

Please read pages 1-36 (Trial Basics & Case Analysis)


Wills and Trusts - Anderson

Book - Scoles, Halbach, et al., Decedents Estates and Trusts (7th ed. Aspen).

Jan. 20: Introduction and Terminology, pp. 1-16 [read pp. 16-26 for background and we will discuss at various times in semester]

Jan. 21: Intestate succession, pp. 27-39

Syllabus will be posted on TWEN.


Will Drafting for the General Practitioner - Begleiter

For Tuesday, Jan. 20, please read pages 1-8 in Lucy A. Marsh, DRAFTING WILLS AND TRUSTS (2009).

 
Last Modified: 6/17/2011 11:03:00 AM by Megan Flynn