First Assignments - Spring 2014
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Advanced Legal Research: Iowa – Lutkenhaus and Wallace

For the first class session on Jan. 23, please
• Read the syllabus (on the TWEN site)
• Identify and write down your top two goals for the class…what do you want to learn or improve upon?
• Be prepared to discuss your personal work and research experiences during the first class, including any examples you can think of when things went particularly well or poorly


Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law - Clark

For the first week of class (1/21 & 1/22), read and be prepared to discuss Gerstenblith (casebook), pp. 1-20 (“What is Art?”).


Civil Procedure II - L. Dore'

A. Required Texts: You should already have the Yeazell Casebook (8th ed.) and the 2013 Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The syllabus for the remainder of the semester will soon be posted on my TWEN page for this course. The SUPPLEMENT materials will also be posted on TWEN.

B. Reading Assignment for Tuesday, January 21, 2014: Please read CASEBOOK: Pages 17-20, 365-384; FEDERAL RULES 8 and 12(b)(6); FEDERAL RULES FORM 11.


Comparative Constitutional Law - Kende

For the first day of class (Tuesday, January 21st), please read pages 1-5, and 13-15 of the TWEN material titled “Introductory Chapter.” It should be the last reading at the bottom of the TWEN course materials page, it is not the first top reading (Germany Introduction). This Introductory Chapter was uploaded with the date 1/17/2014.

For the second day of class (Wednesday, January 22nd), please read pages 15-31 of the same Introductory Chapter.

Note:  This is the draft chapter for a forthcoming book, so it contains some incomplete citations and some notes to myself raising editorial questions.


Conflict of Laws - L. Dore'

Required Text: The text for this course is Lea Brilmayer, Jack Goldsmith, & Erin O’Hara O’Connor, CONFLICT OF LAWS: CASES AND MATERIALS (6th ed. 2011).

Assignment for Tuesday, January 21, 2014:
     - Background and Introduction: Casebook pages xxv-14;
     - TWEN SUPPLEMENT (Methodological Chart).


Constitutional Law I - Kende

For the first day of class (Tuesday, January 21) please read pages 1-25 in the Seidman, Stone Constitutional Law casebook (seventh ed. 2013). 

Also begin reading the U.S. Constitution itself which can be found on pages xli-lvi of the casebook.


Constitutional Law I - Schor

Welcome to Constitutional Law I.
For the first day of class (Tuesday, January 21) please read the following Constitutional provisions:
(1) The Preamble;
(2) Article I: sec. 1; sec. 8, clause 1, clause 3, and clause 18;
(3) Article II: sec. 1; sec. 2;
(4) Article III: sec. 2, clause 1; and
(5) the Tenth Amendment.
Please also read and be ready to discuss Marbury v. Madison. The casebook does not provide questions but I will from time to time provide questions for you to think about as you do the reading for the course.
In conjunction with Marbury, I want you to consider (and be prepared to discuss) the following questions (these are not the only questions I will ask but they will get you started):
(1) What are the arguments that Justice Marshall provides to support his conclusion that the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) has the authority to invalidate statutes that run afoul of the Constitution? Is there any provision of the Constitution that provides SCOTUS with this authority?
(2) How should this power be exercised? What are the examples that Justice Marshall provide of when this authority should be exercised? Do these examples deal with easy or hard cases of unconstitutional statutes?
(3) Do you think that SCOTUS should have the power to invalidate statutes? If SCOTUS lacked this power, who would enforce the Constitution? Why shouldn’t citizens determine whether or not statutes are constitutional by exercising the power to vote? Why shouldn’t our elected officials (such as the President and members of Congress) determine whether or not statutes are unconstitutional?
(4) Is the Court better than anyone else in figuring out what the Constitution means? What can we do if the Court makes a mistake and gets the meaning of the Constitution wrong?


Constitutional Litigation - Lovell

Casebook: Jeffries, Karlan, Low, and Rutherglen, CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIONS: ENFORCING THE CONSTITUTION (3D ED.)

Week 1
Jan. 22

Chapter 1, 42 USC §1983.
Sec. 1: Under Color of Law, pp. 1-18 (Monroe); Appendix 1002-1003 (Sec. 1983)

Register on the Course TWEN page. Read the syllabus and Top 10 List.
Complete the Introduce Yourself form and bring it to class on Wednesday.

Jan. 23
Sec. 2: Suits Against Federal Officers, pp. 18-31 (Bivens)

Jan. 24
Sec. 3: The Eleventh Amendment and Sec. 1983, pp. 31-41 (Hafer);
Sec. 4: Official Immunity, A. Absolute Immunity (Legislators), pp. 42-48 (Bogan)


Constitutional Theory - Schor

    For the first day of class (Monday, January 27, 2014), please read (and be ready to discuss) MODERN CONSTITUTIONAL THEORY (“MCT”): 18-43, 51-72, and 75-79. 
    This is a small section class so it is imperative that you be ready to discuss the material. Class participation will count in the final grade. 
    This material is clearly different than the cases and other sources of law that you are accustomed to reading. Read this material with an eye towards the main point or points that are being advanced by the author rather than with an eye towards detail (which is how we normally read legal sources).                     Constitutions are clearly different than statutes. They are written at a much higher level of generality and they speak to the fundamental values of a nation. 
    In reading the material, I want you to think about the following questions:
(1) What are the values that are at the core of our Constitution? Ely and Tribe have very different ideas on what these values are. Who got it right? Why?
(2) How should the Justices address these values in interpreting the Constitution? Is Dworkin right that these values lie at the core of constitutional interpretation? Why does McConnell disagree?
(3) How does a constitutional republic operate? Do you find the accounts provided by Ackerman or Sunstein persuasive? Why (or why not)?
(4) Is Justice Marshall right that we should be skeptical about claims based on the “goodness” of the pre-Civil War Constitution?


 

Contracts II - Strassberg

Register on the new Contracts II TWEN page for your section to find important course information and the syllabus for next week.


Criminal Procedure I - McCord

     The textbook is Saltzburg & Capra, American Criminal Procedure (9th Ed.) and the 2013 Supplement thereto. There are also readings on the Syllabus that are posted on the TWEN site under “Course Materials.”
     The textbook contains a wealth of case law, both in principal and note cases. Sometimes it is hard to figure out what the most important ones are. So for each assignment, I will list the Important Cases (i.e., the ones you should know by name and/or principle for purposes of the final exam). I will also put an asterisk beside the ones that are the most important. This superabundance of case law is not my fault—the Supreme Court, has taken a handful of words from the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments and spun out from them one of the most incredibly complex bodies of law in existence!
     I am dividing the class into Groups. For each class session the Syllabus will specify which Group is subject to being called on to discuss the reading material. Of course, contributions by any student at any time are encouraged. Also, the Groups will be used for written and oral argument assignments—each student will do several written assignments, and one oral argument during the semester.
Group 1: Bauer-Grubofski
Group 2: Hanson-Loya
Group 3: Lunn-Nelson
Group 4: Noble-Sandy
Group 5: Schachter-Steeves
Group 6: Stille-Woolman

Course Policies

    Grading in this course will be based on 4 components: class attendance, class participation, required writing assignments; and a final exam.
1. Attendance - standard attendance policy applies
2. Class participation - including oral arguments I expect you to be prepared to participate in class on your assigned days, and on the day you are assigned to do an oral argument. Lack of preparedness will result in an appropriate grade reduction.
3. Written assignments - There will be regular written assignments. You should be prepared to turn hard copies of them into me at the end of the class session for which they are assigned (unless otherwise instructed). I do not want to hear things like: • “I have it on my computer, but I didn’t print it out—can I email it to you?” • “I forgot it in my locker—can I put it in your box right after class?” Failure to submit an acceptable written product by the announced deadline can result in a one-level grade reduction.
4. Final exam - As in most law school courses, this will be the largest component of the course grade.

Syllabus Segment I—Introductory Concepts
Week 1

W 1/22Historical background of the 4th Amendment; the “incorporation doctrine;” the exclusionary rule remedy. 652-654, 832-835, 7-16, 494-510.
Group 1 to be called on in class.
Important cases:
Brown 652
Powell 832
Duncan 9*
Mapp 498*
 
R 1/23The requirement of a violation of a “personal Fourth Amendment right,” a/k/a “standing;” no 4th Amendment equivalent of Miranda warnings. 541-557; 462-463.
Group 2 to be called on in class.
Important cases:
Rakas 542*
Rawlings 547
Carter 548*
Schneckloth 462*
Writing assignment for Groups 1 and 2 only: Find and brief a case involving whether the person seeking to contest the search has “standing.” Be prepared to present your case succinctly in class. Indeed, as to every briefing assignment throughout the semester, you should be prepared to present your case in class.

Segment II—What Is a “Search”
F 1/24—Basic parameters of the term “search:” 34-49, 51-58, note c on 76.
Group 3 to be called on in class.
Important cases:
Katz 35*
Oliver *
Dunn 46*
White 48
Greenwood Ciraolo Riley 55
Bond 56*
Brown 76


Criminal Procedure II - Jurs

For the first class session on January 21, 2014, please read the following pages:
     Sixth Amendment Right to Counsel: Types of Charges
     Miller &Wright text, pages 1-19


Debtor Creditor - M. Doré

The reading assignments appear in two books: Warren, Westbrook, Porter & Pottow, 2013 Casebook Supplement for The Law of Debtors and Creditors (Wolters Kluwer paperback) (hereafter "Text") and Mann, Warren, Westbrook 2013 Comprehensive Commercial Law Statutory Supplement (Wolters Kluwer) (hereafter, "Statutory Supplement").

Note: While the listed Statutory Supplement will work best, earlier editions of the same statutory supplement (e.g., a 2012 or 2011 version) will also work fine. Similar commercial law statutory supplements from other publishers should also work, so long as they include the Bankruptcy Code. Please see me if you are not sure about the statutory supplement you plan to use.

I have created a Debtor Creditor course TWEN page. I am currently finalizing the Course Syllabus, which I will post under the “Syllabus” Forum of the TWEN page when it is ready. The first two reading assignments are listed below:

For Wednesday, Jan. 22 Please read pp. 3 – 23 in the Text. Most of this material is a “big picture”overview of the debtor-creditor topic, and, more specifically, of bankruptcy. Don’t worry about the details. We will discuss Problems 1.1 – 1.3 in class, so please read them and give them some thought before coming to class.

For Thursday, Jan. 23 Please read pp. 27 - 43 in the Text. We will discuss Problems 2.1 and 2.2 (pp. 55 – 56 of the Text) in class.

For Friday, Jan. 24 Please read p. 43 – 51 in the Text. We will discuss Problems 2.3 – 2.5 (pp. 56 – 57 of the Text) in class.
 

Employment Discrimination Litigation - Lovell and Bennett

CASES & MATERIALS ON EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION by Zimmer, Sullivan and White (8th ed. Aspen). The 2011 Statutory Supplement is not required; the portion of the Supplement which contains the text of the various Federal antidiscrimination laws is very helpful, but over half of the Supplement is text which is now included in the 8th Edition published in 2012. The course TWEN page will be operational prior to class and will have the Projected Reading Assignments, Syllabus, Introduce Yourself form, and other postings.

Week 1
Jan. 20 - Martin Luther King, Jr. HOLIDAY -  NO CLASS

I encourage you to attend one of the DSM area MLK Celebration events, or watch a movie on employment discrimination, such as North Country, which portrays the systemic class-based sex discrimination/harassment experienced by the first women employed in the iron mines of northern Minnesota, or Made In Dagenham, which portrays the labor strike by women at the Ford car plant that led to enactment of legislation in the United Kingdom that made sex discrimination in pay unlawful, or Nothing But A Man, which portrays the pervasive oppression and racial discrimination, in employment and all aspects of life, blacks faced prior to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, or take the Implicit Bias test and dip into Judge Bennett’s articles on implicit bias. Nothing But A Man is on reserve at the Law Library. 
 
Jan. 21
Come prepared to discuss Slack v. Havens, Hazen Paper v. Biggins. Casebook, pp. 1-16. Chapter 1: Individual Disparate Treatment, Preface, Note to Students, Slack v. Havens, Casebook, pp. 16. (Due to the MLK Holiday, this is the only class we have this first week, so we really do need to dive into these cases!)
 (1) Prior to class you should go online and register on the EDL course TWEN site. Then review the Syllabus and Daily Readings on TWEN.

(2) Print off an Introduce Yourself Form on TWEN, complete it, and bring the hard copy to Tuesday’s class.

(3) You are encouraged to read Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act in its entirety, Supp. pp. 437-461, at the outset of the course. Title VII is the main focus of the course. It is a comprehensive set of statutes and therefore it reads well. You’ll find an overview reading of it in its entirety will help your understanding of the statutory scheme as we progress through the course. For those who return too late to purchase the Casebook before Tuesday’s class, Slack v. Havens is 7 FEP 885 (S.D. Cal. 1973); Hazen Paper v. Biggins, 507 U.S. 604 (1993).

(4) Our Casebook, pp. 9-11, discusses unconscious bias and the Implicit Association Test developed by Project Implicit at Harvard and the University of Washington. https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/demo/selectatest.html. There are more than a dozen different tests on the Project Implicit web site. For the first class, we encourage you to take two tests: Race (Blacks and Whites); and Gender – Career. The results are anonymous. You may want to take many or all of the tests over the course of the semester.

(5) Judge Bennett is doing cutting edge work on the problem of implicit bias, and you will have an opportunity to discuss it with him during his visits. Before Judge Bennett’s visit in February, I encourage you to peruse his two law review articles on implicit bias (posted on TWEN): Mark Bennett, Unraveling the Gordian Knot of Implicit Bias in Jury Selection, 4 Harvard Law & Policy Review 149 (2010); Jerry Kang, Mark Bennett et al, Implicit Bias in the Courtroom, 59 UCLA L.Rev. 1124 (2012). http://www.uclalawreview.org/?p=3576.

The issue of implicit bias was examined in considerable depth during the four week trial in Pippen v. State of Iowa. District Judge Rob Blink found in favor of State Government in this class action race discrimination in employment case. It is currently pending decision on appeal to the Iowa Supreme Court.
 

Environmental Law -  Anderson

Text: Anderson & Hirsch, Environmental Law Practice (3d ed. 2010) The bookstore will not receive these books until the second week of class. In the meantime, I will post a pdf of the reading assignments on the TWEN page.
 
Jan. 23: Read Intro, Foreword, and pp. 1-28; answer Probs. 1.1 to 1.3 for class discussion
Jan. 24: Read pp. 28-55; answer Problems 1.4 to 1.6 for class discussion.


Ethics - Yee

Books: Schwartz, et al., Problems in Legal Ethics (10th Edition);
            Dzienkowski, PR Standards, Rules, and Statutes 2013-2014

1st week (January 21):
Please read Schwartz, Chapters 1 and 2 (pages 1-61) and the following sections of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct: Preamble, Scope and Terminology, §§ 1.0, 4.4(b), 5.5, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5

Please prepare the Discussion Problems for Chapter 1 only.

We will work through the Discussion Problems from Chapter 2 during the next week of class.


Evidence - Jurs

For the First Class Session on January 22, 2014, please read the following pages:
     Federal Rules of Evidence
     GF 1-19; GF FRE 606; Skim All Rules


Gaming Law - Miller

For the first class on Tuesday, January 21, go to the TWEN page for the course:
Miller, Gaming Law 2014.

Read the Administrative Details document for information about the course. We will talk more about all this in Tuesday’s class.

Also, read pages 1-20 in the text. In addition, consider the “What is Gambling” material on the TWEN link, Course Materials.


Intellectual Property in the Internet Age - Yu

The syllabus and the first assignments are available at http://www.peteryu.com/internet/.


International Intellectual Property Law - Yu

The syllabus and the first assignments are available at http://www.peteryu.com/intip/.


International Trade - Clark

For the first week of class (1/21 & 1/22), read and be prepared to discuss Jackson et al. (casebook - “International Economic Relations”), pp. 1-44.


Legal Research - Edwards

Week 1 – January 21-24, 2014

First Research Small Groups meet on Tuesday, January 21

§0
9:00 - Research Group 1, Maggie Hibbs, Opperman LL19
9:00 - Research Group 2, Jacob Lantry, Opperman 261 (Perkins)
11:00 - Research Group 3, Conner Wasson, Opperman 261 (Perkins)

§1
8:30 - Research Group 4, Lauren Van Waardhuizen, Cartwright 206
11:00 - Research Group 5, Robert Evans, Cartwright 207
3:00 - Research Group 6, Brianna Vaughn, Cartwright 203

1) Read chapter 4 in Iowa Legal Research and the week 1 introduction on TWEN. Complete the CALIs on Statutes and Treaties by Monday, January 27.
2) Legal Research class meets on Friday, January 24 at 1:00 (§400) or 11:00 (§401).

Week 2 – January 27–31, 2014

Research Small Groups meet on Monday, January 27

§0
9:00 - Research Group 2, Jacob Lantry, Opperman 261 (Perkins)
11:00 - Research Group 1, Maggie Hibbs, Opperman 282 (Selvy)
11:00 - Research Group 3, Conner Wasson, Cartwright 206

§1
10:00 - Research Group 4, Lauren Van Waardhuizen, Cartwright 203
10:00 - Research Group 5, Robert Evans, Cartwright 201
10:00 - Research Group 6, Brianna Vaughn, Cartwright 206

1) Read the week 2 materials on TWEN and Iowa Legal Research chapter 7 (§401) or 8 (§400). Complete the CALI by Thursday, January 30.
2) Legal Research class meets on Monday, Jan. 27 at 10:00 (§400) or 9:00 (§401).


Legal Writing II - Reel Schmidt

First day of class, Tuesday, January 21, assignment:
• Slocum, Ch. 31.
• Steven D. Stark, Writing to Win Ch. 4 (posted on TWEN).
Fitzgerald Case (posted on TWEN).


Legal Writing II - Shelton

First Day Assignment - Tuesday, January 21

Read Slocum, Ch. 31 and Supplemental Packet pp. 2-16


Legal Writing II - Weresh

Note to students: All materials marked “supplement” are on the TWEN site for the spring course (Legal Writing II – Weresh)

Tues., 1/21 Appellate Briefs: 9:30 - 10:45
Introduction to the Appellate Process and the Appellate Record; Rhetoric and Persuasion
Reading due: Slocum, Ch. 31 Basic Civil Process (Supplement) Steven D. Stark, WRITING TO WIN, Ch. 4 (Supplement)
Thurs., 1/23 Appellate Briefs: 12-1:15
Appellate Briefs: Types of Legal Argument; Theory of the Case; Summary of the Argument
Reading due: Slocum, Chs. 27, 28; Ch. 33, pp. 531-535 only Weresh, Ch. 8, pp. 129-45 Helene S. Shapo, Marilyn R. Walter, Elizabeth Fajans, WRITING AND ANALYSIS IN THE LAW 5th ed.,
Ch. 11 (Supplement) Bryan A. Garner, THE WINNING BRIEF: 100 TIPS FOR PERSUASIVE BRIEFING IN TRIAL AND APPELLATE COURTS 2d. ed., Tips 2 and 8 (Supplement) Mary Beth Beazley, A Practical Guide to Appellate Advocacy, pp. 189-192 (Supplement)


Litigation and Risk Management in Agriculture - Zwagerman

January 21 – Sign up for TWEN site. Links to day one readings and assignment are posted on the Syllabus.


Mergers and Acquisitions - Walker and Wilcox

We will be using the 3rd edition of Professor Therese Maynard’s Mergers & Acquisitions, published last year by Aspen.

Our first class is Wednesday, January 22. The assignment for that first day is to read pages 1- 28 in the Casebook. We will be reviewing the course and course objectives and distributing a syllabus at that time.


Negotiable Instruments - Doré

First Assignments
The reading assignments for this course will come from a document entitled “Basics of Commercial Paper.” You will find that document on the Negotiable Instruments course TWEN page under the Course Materials heading. You should join the TWEN page before the first day of class so that you have access to the readings.

You will also need a statutory supplement that contains Articles 1 and 3 of the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”). I have instructed the Bookstore to stock a Wolters Kluwer UCC supplement edited by Mann, Warren & Westbrook entitled: 2013 Comprehensive Commercial Law Supplement. An earlier edition of that same supplement (e.g., 2012 or 2011) or a similar UCC supplement from another publisher should work fine as a substitute. Check with me if you are not sure about the supplement you plan to use.

I have finalized the Course Syllabus, which I have posted under the “Syllabus” heading of the TWEN page. The Syllabus includes proposed reading assignments for the semester.

For the first day of class, please read Part I of Basics of Commercial Paper (pages 1 – 6) and be prepared to discuss the problems included there. You will need to use your Statutory Supplement to locate the UCC Article 3 provisions that are referenced in the problems.


Products Liability - Miller

For the first class on Tuesday, January 21, read pages 1-24 in the casebook.

Also, go to TWEN and review the Syllabus and Administrative Details. The course is listed as Products Liability 2014, Miller. We will discuss the material, the syllabus, and the administrative details on Tuesday.


Property Law - Anderson

Text: Anderson & Bogart, Property: Practice, Problems and Perspectives. Note that Part I is now available in the bookstore; you will need to buy Part II later this semester.

Wed., 1/22  - Intro, and Property Policies pp. 1-31
Thurs., 1/23 - The Bundle of Sticks pp. 31-61
Fri., 1/24 - The Rule of Capture pp. 63-87


Property Law - Johnson

Welcome to your second semester of law school and to Property Law! This class will give you the opportunity to grapple with challenging issues like ownership of body parts, online virtual worlds, taking private land for the public good, patenting animals, and limiting the otherwise legal activities of landowners, to name a few. I look forward to working through these and other topics with you this semester.

The first assignments are listed below. The TWEN course page is also available - please log into TWEN and read the syllabus before the first day of class.

Wednesday, January 22
1-8, 15-25

Thursday, January 23
 25-48
Be prepared to discuss note (f.) on page 47

Friday, January 24
48-58, 68-79
Watch the following video on YouTube: http://youtu.be/5haObcEJAwM
Be prepared to discuss this question: Does Alan Markovitz have a right to use his property in this manner?


Property Law - Rosenbloom

Welcome to Property Law.
The assignment for the first day of class is to read pages 1-14 (through “Points of Discussion” (f)) in our casebook, SPRANKLING & COLETTA, PROPERTY: A CONTEMPORARY APPROACH (2nd edition West 2012).
Once our TWEN page is uploaded, please log on and download and read Part I of the syllabus. We will review the syllabus on the first day of class. I look forward to meeting you shortly.
NOTE: We will not have class the first week of school (classes for Wed., 1/22 to Fri., 1/24 are CANCELLED). Our first day of class will be Wed., 1/29.


Secured Transactions - Doré

First Assignments
The reading assignments appear in two books: Rusch & Sepinuck, Problems and Materials on Secured Transactions (2d ed. West 2010) (hereafter "Text") and Mann, Warren, Westbrook 2013 Comprehensive Commercial Law Statutory Supplement (Wolters Kluwer) (hereafter, "Statutory Supplement").

Note: We have used the same Secured Transactions casebook for several years now at Drake, so there should be used copies available. While the listed Statutory Supplement will work best, earlier editions of the same statutory supplement (e.g., a 2012 or 2011 version) will also work fine. Similar commercial law statutory supplements from other publishers should also work, so long as they include the UCC with comments. Please see me if you are not sure about the statutory supplement you plan to use.

I have created a Secured Transactions course TWEN page. I am currently finalizing the Course Syllabus, which I will post under the “Syllabus” heading of the TWEN page and also under the “Course Materials” heading on the TWEN page. The Syllabus will include reading assignments for the entire semester.

The first two reading assignments are listed below:

For Wednesday, Jan. 22

Please read pp. 1 – 22 in the Casebook. This is the first of a two-part introduction to the general topic of “debt collection.” There is a lot of information in this introduction, but do not be alarmed. We are not reading this material with the goal of learning all of the details provided, but instead to get a general background that will be helpful to understand the dynamics of a secured lending transaction.

We will cover Problem 1-1 (p. 8 of Casebook) briefly in class, but we will not spend a lot of time on it. Problem 1-1 references the federal Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), which should be included in the Statutory Supplement. I have also posted a copy of the FDCPA under the Course Materials heading of the course TWEN page.

For Thursday, Jan. 23

Please read pp. 22 - 42 in the Casebook. For Problem 1-2 (p. 25 of Casebook) consider the Michigan statute only and omit Part C.

 

Trial Advocacy - All Sections

First Day Assignment – Monday, January 27, 4:30 – 5:20

Book: Steven Lubet, Modern Trial Advocacy, Law School Third Edition

Please read pages 1-36 (Trial Basics & Case Analysis) and 349-402 (Closing Argument)

NOTE: All sections (Yee, Blane/Blink) will meet for this first class only (Jan. 27) at the Clinic Courtroom for required courtroom equipment training. All other Monday classes will be in Room 213.


Trial Advocacy - Yee

First Day Assignment – January 22

Book: Steven Lubet, Modern Trial Advocacy, Law School Third Edition

Please read pages 1-36 (Trial Basics & Case Analysis)


Will Drafting - Begleiter

First Day Assignment - Tuesday, January 21

Please read pages 1-8 in Lucy A. Marsh, DRAFTING WILLS AND TRUSTS (2009).
 


Wills and Trusts - Begleiter

First Day Assignment - Tuesday, January 21

Please read the prefaces to the first and seventh edition and pages 1 – 26 of Scoles, Halbach, Roberts and Begleiter, Problems and Materials on Decedents’ Estates and Trusts (7th ed.).

 
Last Modified: 1/21/2014 11:28:00 AM by John Edwards